Whales of Iceland

Research and Education

Whales of Iceland, Marine Research Institute of Iceland and Elding, a family-run whale watching company, have worked together to on one of the most powerful whale research and education programs in Iceland. The research work is f.ex. carried out with satellite tracking on whales around Iceland, and guest can monitored they’re swimming behavior at interactive station at Whales of Iceland, designed by Gagarín, a company that
develops highly interactive media solutions that allow people to uniquely experience and understand research informations. Elding has for decades kept
track recordings of whales around Iceland with photographs and whale identity
registration. Together, Whales of Iceland and Elding offer education to students all over the world and receive tens of thousands of students annually.

Whales of Iceland audio guided app

You can prepare your visit to Whales of Iceland
by downloading the Whales of Iceland audio guided app to your phone or tablet. The app is a multilingual guidance throughout the exhibition, it also contains
alot of information about the whales in the North Atlantic, their biology, social behavior and fun facts. The app is free and accessible on both Appstore and Googleplay. You can also download the app on site.      We offer freewifii and headphones.

Whale Café & The Whale Souvenir Shop

Inside the exhibition there is a beautiful and relaxing beach where we serve coffee and freshly baked pastries. The café can seat more than 70 people and there is also a sofa area. There you can enjoy the restfullness with a tasty pastry and watch a beautiful whale video or read Moby Dick… The perfect haven when Icelandic weather shows its right face and the right place for good editation before continuing the journey

We are very proud of our souvenir shop. The shop is growing, but it always will be our little whale-souvenir shop. What’s unique about it is that we sell quite a wide range of local handmade products. We are working with individuals who send us products from home, all around our little / big island. Knitting grandmothers, families who work artwork from nature and small businesses selling Icelandic design. Of course, we also offer traditional products that all, regardless of nationality, need to by when traveling, like a magneton the fridge!

Location

Whales of Iceland is located at Grandi erea, Fiskislóð 23. Which is close to the old harbor and about 15 minutes’ walk from the city center. The Grandi area was previously a place for the fishing industri, where fisherman fixed theyr fishing nets and fishing vessels brought their catches. Today, Grandi is becoming one of Reykjavik’s most sought after areas, where you can find many of Iceland’s best restaurants, small shops selling Icelandic design mixed with supermarkets. Grandi is also home to museums that are suitable for everyone. Whales of Iceland is also a short walk to the whale watching area, which makes it easy to book a whale watching tour after a visit to Whales of Iceland. City
bus nr. 14 stops outside the exhibit as well as the Reykjavik sight seeing bus. Free parking

 

Website

Aurora Reykjavik

Welcome to our Northern Lights exhibition

The Northern Lights exhibition in Reykjavik is your first stop when you want to experience the Aurora Borealis in Iceland.

The center is divided into sections which include:

  • History of the Northern Lights
  • Interactive Displays
  • Legends and Stories from around the World
  • Introduction to Northern Lights Photography

 

 

Website

I Heart Reykjavik

It all started with a blog

In 2011 I was working for a travel company here in Reykjavík as a e-marketing manager, although my official title said something completely different (which is irrelevant at this point because basically that was what I was doing), when I came up with an idea for a blog.

I had been an active Couchsurfing host and I had be involved with the Erasmus Student Network at the University of Iceland, not to mention the time I spent abroad and was often the only Icelander around, so a lot of the things I was doing on and off the job was answering people’s questions about Iceland. One day I thought to myself “why isn’t there a place somewhere on the internet where people can get the answers they need?” as I answered the millionth question about the Golden Circle.

Why indeed.

So that’s what I did. I made a place on the internet where people could get the answers to their questions about Iceland. I also promised to offer honest information, seen from the eyes of the local, and I used my knowledge of how search engines and social media work to make sure that people could find the answers.

I didn’t have a big plan back then or an agenda. I did want to show my boss, to whom I had unsuccessfully pitched this idea about a blog, that he was wrong but that was about it. Maybe, if the blog would be successful, I would be able to use it to show off my skills when applying for a job once I had finished the degree that I was working on at the time. First and foremost I just wanted to help people. That’s kind of my thing. I’m a compulsive helper.

To make a long story short it never came to using the blog to find a job. I also haven’t finished my degree but that’s a whole different story.

Fast forward a few years: A blog becomes an empire

OK, an empire is maybe taking it a little bit too far but at some point, when I had been writing the blog for a few years, it all became a bit too much to handle. I was studying full time, I also had a almost a full job as a freelance consultant and then I when I had some free time I spent it on the blog. As you can imagine I didn’t get a lot of sleep back then. Or much of anything actually.

I was left with a difficult decision: I would either have to kill the blog or I would have to find a way to make the blog my job. Killing my baby didn’t sound appealing so turning the blog into a mini empire became the next logical step. So I left school, broke up with most of my consulting clients and dove into starting my own business.

To be honest, now that I look back, even though I had finished more than half a business degree when I started my business I didn’t really know what I was getting myself into. If I had known, I probably wouldn’t have embarked on this journey. Not because I haven’t enjoyed it, I’ve LOVED every minute of it, but because it’s a lot of hard work.

Sleep is still a luxury.

I Heart Reykjavík today

I started off small and only offered one product to begin with: The I Heart Reykjavík Walking Tour. Then I started offering a few tours through my partners and finally I made a deal with a car rental agency to offer affordable car rental through the blog. Before I knew it thousands of people had taken my tour and all of a sudden I was an employer.

All of this in the span of 12 months or so.

Today I Heart Reykjavík strives to make sure that your visit to Reykjavík will be the best it can be. We do that by offering unique and interesting experiences and by partnering up with companies we know will take good care of you.

We care about social responsibility, honesty and integrity and we try to reflect that in everything we do. We also love what we do and count our blessings every day. We heart this city and we want you to heart it too.

 

 

 

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Magic Iceland

Live & Love & Laugh with Local Legends!

Meet the “Fantastic 4! Every single Private Gourmet Tour is a unique adventure. We are humble, happy and proud of what we do. Our “job” is to have fun and make sure that everyone else has great fun!

We truly are FOODIES and as such, NIceland is a little “gourmet heaven” that is so much fun to enjoy. We love challenges and we can assure you that any type of food preferences will be met with joy and passion, and here we quote our good friend Pat Benatar: “Hit me with your best shot!”

It takes at least two to tango and we have the fortune of meeting great people from all over the world that allow us to dance like there is no tomorrow! Like one of our fellow “tango partners” put it: “This wasn’t a tour so much as it was an experience”.

The combined “superpowers” of the Fantastic 4 include:

 

  • Maximising joy every moment of “this thing called life”.
  • Passion for sharing our story, food, nature and culture with our fellow travellers.
  • Curiosity about the culture and personality of our “fellow travelling earthlings”

 

Website

Plan Iceland

Iceland is an island in the North Atlantic Ocean. It is famous for its magnificent nature, geothermal energy and the idiosyncratic nature of its inhabitants.

Its landscape is marked by glaciers, volcanoes, hot springs, and absolutely no trees. It has become a popular destination for adventurers and seekers of the unusual, offering white water rafting, glacial snowmobiling and hot-spring bathing, as well as phenomena such as the midnight sun and The Northern Lights.

Icelanders have never been known to go the beaten path. Descendants of the ancient vikings (but these days relatively civilized), the nation of Iceland has elected the first woman president, the first openly lesbian prime minister, and was the first country in the world to acknowledge the sovereign state of Estonia. Jón Gnarr, the mayor of Reykjavík, the capital city, was a comedian who ran for office as a joke.

Despite its meager population, it has birthed such famous musicians as Björk, SigurRós, and Of Monsters And Men. Other accomplished Icelanders include 3 different winners of the Miss World competition and two strongmen who each won the World’s Strongest Man competition four times over.

Icelandic, the language of Iceland, is considered the closes living relative of ancient Norse, and is as such related to most of the Scandinavian languages. Here are some fun words to try to learn in Icelandic:

Eyjafjallajökull (AY-yah-fyad-layer-kuh-tel) – The name of the volcano that erupted in 2010. A great word to say to impress your friends, and better yet, almost nobody will be able to correct you if you’re saying it wrong.
“Einn bjór takk” (aydn byor tack) – “One beer please”. The double “n” is pronounced as a sneeze.
“Jæja” (yaya) – an all-round conversation filler. Use it to fill an uncomfortable silence, to signal that you have to go, or just to entertain yourself when you’re bored.
“Gerðu það” (gerthu thath) – the closest icelandic equivalent of “please”. Literally means “do it”
“Ógeðslega gott!” (Oh!-gethslega got) – normal way to say “very good”. Literally means “disgustingly good!”

 

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Secret Iceland

We specialize in tours for individuals and small groups seeking personal service. We focus on secret places out of sight and most of them are still undisturbed and untouched.

Otherworldly Places
Lakagigar or Craters of Laki are not easily accessible but the scenery there is like nothing on earth (Iceland has a lot of places that are like nothing on earth but this one stands out) and it has this otherworldly feel. Secret Iceland is a licensed tour operator, authorized by the Icelandic Tourist Board since 2010. Owners of Secret Iceland are the brothers Guðmann and Trausti. They are both highly experienced and are certified local guides in Katla Geopark.

Office:
Hótel Laki Efri Vík
Kirkjubærjarklaustur
Iceland

Website

Lava Center Iceland

Lava is dedicated to Iceland‘s riveting volcanic activity and its frequent earthquakes.
The centre will feature an interactive educational exhibition revealing the science and aesthetics of Iceland‘s spectacular geological features. In the learning center our experts will excite and educate its guests with earth-shattering tales of „Iceland on the Move.“

The interactive exhibition will display a collection of artifacts, films and graphics from various volcanic eruptions that have occurred in the past century.

Lava will be the hub for day trips and tours in South Iceland and a Tourist Information Center for the region. Lava will include a souvenir shop, restaurant and a cozy coffeehouse. Lava will also be the main gate to Iceland‘s new Katla Geopark.

Office:
Austurvegur 14
Hvolsvelli

Website

How Do You Like Iceland

How Do You Like Iceland is a fully licensed tour operator and a travel company based in Reykjavik, Iceland. We specialize in adventure, sightseeing and hiking tours. We aim to provide the best service possible to make your vacation the unforgettable experience of a lifetime.
In addition to our scheduled day tours, we can also arrange custom private tours for our clients.

Office:
Einivellir 5
220 Hafnarfjörður

Website

The Icelandic Nation

Facts About the Icelandic Nation

Icelandic Population:

306,694 (July 2010 est.), country comparison to the world: 178

Icelandic Age structure:

0-14 years: 20.7% (male 32,268/female 31,308),

15-64 years: 67.1% (male104,158/female 101,584),

65 years and over: 12.2% (male 16,952/female 20,424) (2010 est.)

Icelandic Population growth rate:

0.741% (2010 est.), country comparison to the world: 145

Icelandic Birth rate:

13.43 births/1,000 population (2010 est.),country comparison to the world: 155

Icelandic Death rate:

6.85 deaths/1,000 population (July 2010 est.) country comparison to the world: 137

Icelandic Urbanization:

urban population: 92% of total population (2008) rate of urbanization: 0.8% annual rate of change (2005-10 est.)

Icelandic Sex ratio: at birth:

1.04 male(s)/female, 65 years and over: 0.83 male(s)/female

Icelandic Infant mortality rate:

3.23 deaths/1,000 live births, country comparison to the world: 218

Icelandic Life expectancy at birth:

80.67 years, country comparison to the world: 13,
male: 78.53 years
female: 82.9 years (2010 est.)

Icelandic Total fertility rate:

1.9 children born/woman (2010 est.), country comparison to the world: 146

Icelandic HIV/AIDS – adult prevalence rate:

0.2% (2007 est.), country comparison to the world: 104

Religions in Iceland:

Lutheran Church of Iceland 80.7%, Roman Catholic Church 2.5%, Reykjavik Free Church 2.4%, Hafnarfjorour Free Church 1.6%, other religions 3.6%, unaffiliated 3%, other or unspecified 6.2% (2006 est.)

Icelandic Languages:

Icelandic, English, Nordic languages, German widely spoken

Icelandic Literacy:

99%

Icelandic School life expectancy (primary to tertiary education):

18 years
male: 17 years
female: 19 years (2010 est.)

Icelandic Education expenditures:

7.6% of GDP (2004), country comparison to the world: 16

The Icelandic language

Icelandic is the national language and is believed to have changed very little from the original tongue spoken by the Norse settlers.  Iceland was settled by Nordic people in the 9th century – tradition says that the first permanent settler was Ingólfur Arnarson, a Norwegian Viking who made his home where Reykjavík now stands.

The Icelanders still speak the language of the Vikings, although modern Icelandic has undergone changes of pronunciation and, of course, of vocabulary! Iceland is alone in upholding another Norse tradition, i.e. the custom of using patronymics rather than surnames; and Icelander´s christian name is followed by his or her father´s name and the suffix -son or -dóttir, e.g. Guðrún Pétursdóttir (Guðrún, daughter of Pétur). Members of a family can therefore have many different „surnames“, which sometimes causes confusion to foreigners!
Here are some examples of Icelandic words:
Hotel = Hotel
Accommodation = Gisting
Car = Bill
Carrental = Bilaleiga
In plural: Carrentals = Bílaleigur
Drive = Aka
Rent a Bike = Leigja hjol